Home Travel BlogNew Zealand Travel Blog Cool Kawakawa Toilets: The Hunderwasser Toilets, New Zealand

Cool Kawakawa Toilets: The Hunderwasser Toilets, New Zealand

by Silke Elzner

It doesn’t happen very often that we pull over on a road trip in some sleepy rural town to photograph a public toilet. No, let me rephrase that. It has never happened before. That is, until we took a break in Kawakawa in the Bay of Islands region in New Zealand. Kawakawa is a sleepy town in the hinterland of the Bay of Islands, and it’s home of the only Hundertwasser Toilet in New Zealand.

There really is not that much to write home about in Kawakawa, New Zealand. Most people may know it as one of the places that the Bay of Islands Vintage Railway runs through on its way to Opua. No more than around 1,400 people live here, mostly making a living off the land.

But it is the public toilets in the centre of town that have attracted TV crews from Japan and France – Kawakawa is an unlikely media superstar.

Reclaimed Bricks and Colourful Bottle Glass are part of the Hundertwasser Toilet New Zealand

Reclaimed Bricks and Colourful Glass Bottles are part of the Hundertwasser Toilet New Zealand

A Hundertwasser Toilet in New Zealand

So what is so cool about the toilet block on main street? That, my dear reader, becomes immediately clear when you have a closer look at it. This is not your usual toilet. This is a Hundertwasser toilet.

Friedensreich Hundertwasser was a successful Austrian artist who is known for his sustainable and playful designs. You may have heard of the Hundertwasser House in Vienna before, or the Hot Springs Village of Blumau.

Hundertwasser’s artwork can only be described as quirky and fantastical. Wavy forms, the integration of natural elements, a popping colour palette. Not unlike a children’s drawing where windows seem slightly crooked and oversized. At any Hundertwasser project the impossible is made possible: Trees grow on terraces, nature reconquers niches, roofs are sloped and floors uneven.

What I love about him in particular is the name that he acquired over time (he was actually born Friedrich Stowasser, but this was probably a too boring name for a creative person like himself). Friedensreich means Abundance of Peace, Hundertwasser Hundred Waters. He also added the middle names of Regentag (rainy day) and Dunkelbunt (dark multi coloured).

What a fascinating person, don’t you think?

Recycled colourful glass bottles: Kawakawa Toilet, New zealand

Recycled colourful glass bottles: Kawakawa Toilet, New zealand

Hundertwasser’s Art: A Curious Relationship with Feces

The reason why you will find a Hundertwasser art project in the sleepy town of Kawakawa is because the famous Viennese architect fell in love with this beautiful part of New Zealand. So he purchased a remote rural property somewhere in the Bay of Island region and moved there in 1973. He spent the best part of his late life in this community, enjoying the anonymity and the simple pleasures in life.

When Kawakawa required an update of the existing toilet block in the town centre, Hundertwasser volunteered a design that would overnight turn Kawakawa into an off the beaten path tourist destination. The toilets couldn’t be more “Hundertwasser” even if they tried; you will find all the elements here, just like in the bigger projects on the other side of the globe.

Recycled materials are some of the typical style features in any Hundertwasser project, and so you will find lots of saved glass bottles integrated in the walls. They add colour to the natural light, not unlike the stained glass windows in churches. And indeed, Hundertwasser himself once compared toilets to churches, pointing out the meditative factor of visiting both places.

And here’s a fun fact: Friedensreich Hundertwasser had a curious relationship with toilets and feces. He has even written a manifesto The Holy Shit which explores the important role of waste within the circle of nature. For him, it is all connected – becoming so obvious also in the Kawakawa toilets where a mature tree grows right in the centre.

The Design of the Hundertwasser Toilet is colourful and happy, just like the many other projects around the world that come from this artist.

The cool Design of the Hundertwasser Toilet is colourful and happy, just like the many other projects around the world that come from this artist.

The new Cool: Foul Smells and Recylced Materials

Lots and lots of details can be explored at the Hundertwasser Toilet New Zealand. For example, there are lots of hand painted tiles and custom made features, statues and artwork. But don’t be mistaken – this is indeed a public toilet. Visitors and curious tourists mix with people that are actually here to relieve themselves. You have to be a bit mindful when taking photos and exploring the space. And don’t be surprised to find that even a Hundertwasser toilet can smell foul like any other public toilet in the world.

It’s a marvellous present that Hundertwasser has left behind for this tiny, struggling community. It is the only example of cool Hundertwasser art in the Southern Hemisphere, so if you want to visit one of the other buildings you will indeed need to travel very far.

Hundertwasser died onboard the QE2 on a trip back home to Europe in 2000. He was 71 years old. He is buried on his New Zealand farm in his garden of the Happy Dead.

How to see the Hundertwasser Toilet in New Zealand

To see the Hundertwasser Toilet in Kawakawa, just drive to the small town of Kawakawa yourself and go to the centre of town. It’s the cheerful building on Main Street with the tree growing out of the top. Entry is free, but you may find more people than usual showing a keen interest in the toilets!

It may not necessarily be worthwhile to go to Kawakawa by public transport just to see the loos, unless you are a huge Hundertwasser fan. But if you want to join a tour of the Bay of Islands region, this one will also do a pit stop to see the toilets in Kawakawa! Check rates for Paihia: Jeep Wrangler Half-Day Private Sightseeing Tour. (Affiliate Link)

You may Also Want to Read This

City Trip Ideas: Romantic Getaways and Offbeat Destinations

10 Things to do in Russell, NZ (Bay of Islands)

8 excuses for road tripping New Zealand’s North Island (and some stunning photos, too)

Hundertwasser's style can be be seen in every part of the toilets. Here, the wash basin with colourful wall tiles.

Hundertwasser’s style can be be seen in every part of the toilets. Here, the wash basin with colourful wall tiles.

Hand and personalised crafted tiles at the Kawakawa toilet.

Hand and personalised crafted tiles at the Kawakawa toilet.

Artwork in the lady's toilet, adding happiness and charm to a normally ordinary place.

Artwork in the lady’s toilet, adding happiness and charm to a normally ordinary place.

The Hundertwasser Toilet in New Zealand is the only artwork of him in the Southern Hemisphere.

The Hundertwasser Toilet in New Zealand is the only artwork of him in the Southern Hemisphere.