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The roofs of Dubrovnik

The fantastic Dubrovnik City Walls will let you see the city in a whole new light

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The early bird catches the worm, or so they say. So we make sure we are one of the first on this day to climb the famous Dubrovnik City Walls. It’s a wise decision as the walls are popular, and we are avoiding the larger crowds that will appear later in the day.

The walls are a remarkable feat of medieval engineering and testament to the power and wealth of one of the most progressive Mediterranean cities in its time, dating back to the 14th century. Impressive this structure is indeed. Up to 6m thick and up to 25m tall, almost 2km in length, uninterrupted, and fortified by a number of towers, forts and gates. Built to protect the citizens of Dubrovnik from any attack by land or sea.

A Dubrovnik must-do experience

Walking the full length of the city walls is a must-do for any visitor to Dubrovnik, the best way to take in spectacular views across the roof tops and out at sea. The photos I am sharing below will take you on the tour starting from the Pile Gate (the main entrance to the old town) in a counter-clockwise fashion around the city.

Highlights include the unusual perspective on the Large Onofrio’s Fountain and the main street Placa from above, a close encounter with the casemate Bokar which is featured in the popular TV show Game of Thrones, the massive drop along the cliffside of the city where you will also find the famous Cafe Buza, the views of the old port with the St. John Fortress, and the curiously shaped round Minčeta Tower which is also starring in Game of Thrones as House of the Undying.

New and intimate views of the city

But there is more to it than just a list of attractions that you could also see from other angles, not necessarily from the top of the City Walls. There is this intimate peek into the lives of the Dubrovnik citizens. The cats on the rooftops, the closed shutters, the weedy backyards, the washing outside the windows.

There’s the peacefulness of looking out at sea with the waves hitting the rocks below in a never-ending game on replay. There’s the tactile sensation of old weathered stone that has found its destiny centuries ago and has played a role of defence ever since.

The city of Dubrovnik, opened up in front of us like an oyster shell. A maze of houses and narrow lanes, stairs, terracotta roofs.

People gardening among the ruins of derelict houses that are usually not visible to the public eye. A sea of red roofs, warming up in the hot summer sun, with pointy church towers breaking up the up-and-down waves of rather humble residential houses.

An accidental lapidarium behind a church building, maybe stored here for planned restoration, the view blocked off on the street level, but reliefs and masonry works clearly visible from your secret vantage point.

New perspectives, an exclusive invitation to discover the city of Dubrovnik in a whole new way.

You might also want to check this out

10 awesome things to see and do in Dubrovnik

Why you don’t need to join a tour to see the Dubrovnik Game of Thrones locations

35 dreamy photos that will make you want to go to Dubrovnik today

For more stories about Dubrovnik, click here

Large Onofrio's Fountain as seen from above

Looking down the city wall

The Pile Gate from above

The Stradun or Placa

Churches and roof tops

Red tile roofs of Dubrovnik

City wall panorama

The church

Bokar fortress

The city wall and moat

A privy along the wall in Dubrovnik

Fort Lovrijenac

A chapel

The backyards

A window

Cafe Buza Dubrovnik

A church tower

Orderly lines

The colours of the roof tiles

Closed green shutters

City wall views Dubrovnik

Orange tree

A church

Sveti Ivan

Dubrovnik old port as seen from city wall

Narrow streets clearly visible

Stairs

City wall panorama

Minčeta tower

Silke Elzner

AUTHOR - Silke Elzner

Hello! My name is Silke. Happiness and Things is a travelogue about amazing European destinations and beautiful places around the world. I believe that beauty is even in the smallest things and I want to inspire you to see the world differently. Read more about it here.

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